Adapted from Tips & Tricks by Michael Tyler of www.CarveBuddy.com

Let’s continue last month’s Tips article by covering a few more “essentials” that everyone should know.

 

Backing-Up Your Favorites Folder

It’s always a good idea to back-up important files so that you can recover from “unexpected events” concerning your computer. We can’t even count the times we’ve had customers call in after their computer crashed and they lost all the patterns they spent hours making themselves.  All those patterns that you create or purchase are stored in your Favorites folder, and it can be backed up.

Setting up a Back-Up Location

There are several different places that you can back your files up to some of the ones that we recommend are Google Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Drop Box, a dedicated USB thumb drive, or an external hard drive. With many of these they have an automatic back-up option that you can set-up to have your Favorites File and Projects Folder automatically back-up on a preset schedule. For the USB thumb drive or external hard drive windows has built in back up features that you can use.

Back-up from Windows XP-7

From your main desktop click on the Windows icon in the lower left corner of the screen, then select where it has your name or account name in the upper right-hand corner of the start menu. This will put you in your user directory and you should see a folder named CarveWright, double click this folder to open it. In side this folder you will see a file named Favorites.mpn or just Favorites, this is where all of the work that you save to your favorites in designer in saved to (Under the blue sea shell icon in your project designer software). Once you have this file located use the back up service of your choice to copy this file to. You will also want to back-up the folder where you save all of your project files to your selected back-up location.

Back-up from Windows 8-10

Open Windows Explorer (the icon that looks like a manilla folder on your desktop or taskbar), locate your C drive (should be named C:, This PC (C:), or This Computer(C:)). In your C: drive locate the User folder and open it, then find your user account and open it. You should see a folder named CarveWright, double click this folder to open it. In side this folder you will see a file named Favorites.mpn or just Favorites, this is where all of the work that you save to your favorites in designer in saved to (Under the blue sea shell icon in your project designer software). Once you have this file located use the back-up service of your choice to copy this file to. You will also want to back-up the folder where you save all of your project files to your selected back-up location.

Back-up From MacOS

Select Go from your Finder bar and select Computer, next you will select your main disk drive (OSX) and open it. You will need to find your User folder and then select your user account and open it. You will find the folder named Library you need to open this folder. You should see a folder named CarveWright, double click this folder to open it. In side this folder you will see a file named Favorites.mpn or just Favorites, this is where all of the work that you save to your favorites in designer in saved to (Under the blue sea shell icon in your project designer software). Once you have this file located use the back-up service of your choice to copy this file to. You will also want to back-up the folder where you save all of your project files to your selected back-up location.

To restore it, just copy that file from your backup location to the original location as outlined above, after your computer is fixed!

 

Bit Optimization

Using the “Bit Optimization” feature in Designer can make a dramatic difference in how well your carvings turn out. Most often, choosing “Bit Optimization – BEST” will yield cleaner, more defined detail in your carving projects.

Bit Optimization sets the limit with which the bit carves into tight areas to preserve the top level detail.

As an example lets import a photograph and place it on the board. Photographs are good example because of the large amount of individual pixels that can vary greatly in depth. Some of these pixels can be deep, but they are right next to high pixels, essentially creating a “hole”.  When the bit goes to carve this, it will cause a widening of that hole from the diameter of the bit.

Find more about bit optimization and the other important Project Optimization techniques through the following tutorials:

Chapter 2 – Carving Signs and Lithophanes

Most of the Software Basics tutorials utilize optimization techniques

 

Use The Handy “Grid” Function

You may have noticed in another article or video where there was a grid of “squares” on the board surface. This is a really nice feature to help you layout objects with a degree of precision. The Grid can be viewed/turned on by selecting “View/Toggle Grid Lines” from the Designer menu. By default, the grid is laid out in ½”squares. You can change the size of the grid by selecting “Layout/Snap” from the Designer menu. The following window pops up…

You can set several options here. I usually select “Center Grid” so the grid is equidistant from all edges of the board, and I’ll often type in a new value for the snap interval to change the “square” sizes (.25 or whatever). I’ll also normally select “Snap Objects to Grid”. After you make your desired settings, click “OK” to return to your main screen and you’ll see the new grid layout superimposed over the surface of the board. If you selected “Snap to Grid” then all objects you move around on the board will “snap” to the nearest square to help you space and line up objects while laying out your design. To turn off the snap feature, reopen “Layout/Snap” and deselect the “Snap Objects to Grid”. (You can also turn off the “View Grid” display via this window as well.) The grid feature is often overlooked by newcomers, so I wanted to alert you to this very handy feature!

The grid tool is utilized in this video tutorial.

2 thoughts on “BEGINNER’S TIPS – PART 2

Comments are closed.